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Rating: 7.5 stars

Tags

Japan kabuki geisha samurai ronin revenge thief performance remake

Seen 1 time

Seen on: 02/03/2014

View on: IMDb | TMDb

An Actor's Revenge (1963)

Directed by Kon Ichikawa

Drama

Most recently watched by sleestakk

Overview

While performing in a touring kabuki troupe, leading female impersonator Yukinojo comes across the three men who drove his parents to suicide twenty years earlier, and plans his revenge, firstly by seducing the daughter of one of them, secondly by ruining them…

Length 113 minutes

Actors

Shintarō Katsu | Eiji Funakoshi | Ganjiro Nakamura | Kazuo Hasegawa | Fujiko Yamamoto | Ayako Wakao | Jun Hamamura | Saburo Date | Raizō Ichikawa | Chûsha Ichikawa | Eijirô Yanagi | Narutoshi Hayashi | Masayoshi Kikuno | Kikue Môri | Yutaka Nakayama

Viewing Notes

Like a stage play captured for a feature film. I imagine that it was before I dig into the details. Most everything here looks like a sound stage even when it is not. But the story is very personal driven by interaction and conversation. Very few moments without dialogue.

Kazuo Hasegawa is excellent portraying two roles, which I didn’t realize until the end. Ayako Wakao is overly cute but overshadowed by the stronger presence of Fujiko Yamamoto, who should’ve had a bigger career. She’s amazing.

Guess I wrote too soon because the accompanying essay in the extras filled some gaps regarding the actors. Fujiko Yamamoto actually did have a significant career of 50 films during career with her last in 1963 (she actually was voted Miss Japan in 1950 in what I believe was their first national beauty pageant).

Learning about the wonderful careers of many of the actors only made me more sad regarding the lack of accessibility for most of their films. Not just here in the US but even in Japan. How many are even available now?

For example, this was 5th time this story was adapted for film (plus three times as a TV series). And yet this is the only one of those available stateside to my knowledge. Tragic considering how significant the story is in Japanese history and culture.

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